Consequences of cruelty

As a guide to which of the sections below to use with the young person, we suggest that you use the online assessment tool Developing a suitable intervention programme (Word 17KB).


What would an RSPCA officer do?

What would an RSPCA officer do?

This activity builds on the scenarios introduced in the activity Be an RSPCA officer in the section Who is responsible? Young people now get the opportunity to discover what sorts of legal consequences there can be if you are cruel to animals, whether it is intentional or not.

They will:

  • develop the understanding that cruelty to animals has a negative impact on more than just the animals involved
     
  • gain a better understanding of some of the possible legal consequences for anyone who is cruel to animals.

Number of participants: You can run this activity with just one person or in a small group.


How long it will take: Each activity will take 10 minutes to discuss and  10-15 minutes to complete.

 

Download full facilitation guide: What would an RSPCA officer do (Word 1MB)


Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets
  • Facilitators' notes

Animals and the law

Animals and the law

In this activity, young people consider scenarios involving humans and animals, and decide whether they are lawful.

Young people will:

  1. begin to realise that animals are protected by law
  2. explore which human actions towards animals are against the law
  3. explore the concept that just because an action is lawful, it is not necessarily in the best interests of the animal.

Number of participants: You can run this activity with just one person or in a small group.


How long it will take: Each activity will take 15 to 30 minutes.


Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets
  • Facilitators' notes