The cruelty incident

As a guide to which of the sections below to use with the young person, we suggest that you use the online assessment tool Developing a suitable intervention programme (Word 17KB).


What triggers cruelty?

What triggers cruelty?

This is a good activity to do before you look at the young person┬┐s own incident. It allows him or her to investigate some of the triggers of animal cruelty in a non-judgmental, objective way.

In this activity, young people investigate what types of feelings or events might trigger an animal cruelty incident. They think about how these might be managed to prevent one from happening in the future.

Young people will develop the understanding that:

  • there is a range of events, feelings and emotions that may trigger an animal cruelty incident
  • there are ways to manage strong negative feelings

Number of participants: You can run this activity with just one person, or in a small group.


How long it will take: The activity will take 20 to 60 minutes.

 

Download the full facilitation guide: What triggers cruelty (Word 5MB)

 

Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets
  • Facilitators' notes

Revisiting the incident

Revisiting the incident

In this activity, the young person revisits their own incident, and accepts what happened and their role within it. They consider what triggered it and the impact it had on others.

The young person:

  • investigates the incident, looking at what happened and why
  • takes responsibility for what happened.

Number of participants: We recommend you run this activity with just one person.


How long it will take: The activity will take 30 to 60 minutes, depending on the medium you use.
 

Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets
  • Facilitators' notes

My triggers and action plan for the future

My triggers and action plan for the future

In this activity, the young person explores how they can avoid reoffending by managing some of the triggers identified in the activity Revisiting the incident. They complete an action plan to help them avoid reoffending and think about positive goals for themselves.

The young person:

  • increases their awareness of the strategies they can use to manage their own trigger factors and prevent reoffending
  • examines how the incident might have evolved differently, if these strategies had been used at the time of the incident
     
  • creates an action plan to help them avoid offending behaviour in the future
     
  • records any positive future goals.

Number of participants: We recommend you run this activity with just one person.


How long it will take: The activity will take 60 minutes.
 

Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets

Consequences of my actions

Consequences of my actions

In this activity, the young person thinks about how their actions have affected them and others. They have the opportunity to empathise with the animal as the victim, as well as other people.

The young person will develop the understanding that:

  • there are consequences to their actions
  • their actions have resulted in them entering the youth justice system and being put on an order
  • taking part in this incident has affected them in other ways as well
  • their actions have had a negative effect on other people, in a variety of ways
  • their actions have caused an animal or animals to suffer.

Number of participants: We recommend you run this activity with just one person.


How long it will take: The activity will take 30 to 60 minutes, depending on the medium you use.
 

Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets
  • Factsheets