Who is responsible?

As a guide to which of the sections below to use with the young person, we suggest that you use the online assessment tool Developing a suitable intervention programme (Word 17KB).


The visit

The visit

In this activity, young people have the opportunity to put into practice what they have been learning about taking personal responsibility towards animals.

They will develop the understanding that:

  • we all have a responsibility to meet the needs of animals
     
  • our behaviour can have an effect on animals.


Number of participants: You can run these activities with just one person or in a small group.


How long it will take: The activity could take a half day or a whole day.
 

Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets
  • Facilitators' notes

Taking responsibility

Taking responsibility

In this activity, young people are asked what society would expect them to do if they came across animals that were not theirs, but were obviously suffering.

Young people will develop:

  • the understanding that society expects us to care for and help not only our own animals, but also any that do not belong to us, or any wild animals that are in need
     
  • knowledge about what to do in situations similar to those in the scenarios
     
  • empathy with wild and farm animals.


Number of participants: You can run these activities with just one person or in a small group.


How long it will take: The activity will take about 15 to 30 minutes.
 

Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets
  • Facilitators' notes

Ground rules for wild animals

Ground rules for wild animals

The young person will learn that if we own an animal, or come into contact with one, we are responsible for its needs and society expects us to be responsible for it.

Our actions can affect wild animals. This can be on purpose or by accident. In places where wild animals live we need to behave in a way that does not scare or harm them.


Number of participants: You can run these activities with just one person or in a small group.


How long it will take: The activity will take about 20 to 30 minutes.
 

Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets
  • Facilitators' notes
  • Fact sheets

Ground rules for pet animals

Ground rules for pet animals

In this group of activities, young people develop an understanding that cruelty means causing suffering, either because of something you have done, or something you have omitted to do. They will learn how to identify suffering in relation to specific cases and relate this back to the five freedoms.

Before you do this activity, it would be best to do some activities from the Basic welfare needs and sentience section, particularly the Smiley face activity.


Number of participants: You can run these activities with just one person or in a small group.


How long it will take: The activities will take about 15 to 30 minutes.
 

Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets
  • Facilitators' notes
  • Fact sheets

Ground rules for farm animals

Ground rules for farm animals

In this group of activities, young people develop an understanding that cruelty means causing suffering, either because of something you have done, or something you have omitted to do. They will learn how to identify suffering in relation to specific cases and relate this back to the five freedoms.

Before you do this activity, it would be best to do some activities from the Basic welfare needs and sentience section, particularly the Smiley face activity.


Number of participants: You can run these activities with just one person or in a small group.


How long it will take: The activities will take about 15 to 30 minutes.
 

Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets
  • Facilitators' notes
  • Fact sheets

Categorising animals

Categorising animals

This activity extends the ideas introduced in the Everyday objects activity, but it can work as a standalone session. In it, young people begin to understand the relationship between the role of animals in all our lives and our responsibilities towards them.

They will explore the concept that:

  • more than one person may be responsible for meeting the needs of an animal
  • even if we have an indirect link with an animal, we can have a sense of responsibility towards it and take action to ensure its welfare.


Number of participants: You can run these activities with just one person or in a small group.


How long it will take: The activities will take about 15 to 30 minutes.

 

Download full facilitation guide: Categorising animals (Word 2MB)
 

Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets
  • Facilitators' notes
  • Fact sheets

Be an RSPCA officer

Be an RSPCA officer

In this activity, young people discover the role an RSPCA officer has, and get the opportunity to consider the type of advice that an officer would give in two different situations.

By the end of this session the young person will:

  • understand that if you own an animal you are responsible for meeting its needs.


Number of participants: You can run these activities with just one person or in a small group.


How long it will take: The activities will take about 15 to 30 minutes.
 

Included in this guide:

  • Activity sheets
  • Facilitators' notes
  • Fact sheets